FUN WITH MAPS – ISSUE 2021-199 DAILY FEATURE:

By Steve Kovacs (Introduction by Chuck Gibson)

LOVELAND, OH (October 14, 2021) – In Issue 2021-199 of Steve Kovacs Fun with Maps, we learn from whence our English language came. (Or, something like that.)

THE ONE HISTORICAL DATE EVERY BRITISH CHILD KNOWS

Today is the 955th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings.  The 1066 battle was fought between the Norman-French army of William, Duke of Normandy, and the English army of the Anglo-Saxon king, Harold Godwinson.

When King Edward (the Confessor) died childless, there was a skirmish for power among the remaining relatives.  Although Harold was crowned king, many fractioned groups remained.

William came to claim what he considered his due title, bringing considerable men, ships, and arms from France.  When William was crowned king in 1066, his lineage sealed the throne and united the country.

The mixing of the language of the Normans and the Anglo-Saxons make up what is known as “English” and William’s influence gave the isolated Anglo-Saxons a stronger link to the rest of Europe.

The map of Sussex, with Hastings located, is shown here.  It is by Moules from 1840.

Map of Sussex – 1840 (Credit Steve Kovacs)

Steve Kovacs and his wife Theresa reside in Loveland, Ohio where they raised their two children. He is a passionate collector of antique maps.

Visit his antique map boutique world-on-paper online. Watch for his daily feature Steve Kovacs: Antique Maps & Fun Facts here on Loveland Beacon.